First Case of Human Babesiosis in Korea: Detection and Characterization of a Novel Type of Babesia sp. (KO1) Similar to Ovine Babesia

@article{Kim2007FirstCO,
  title={First Case of Human Babesiosis in Korea: Detection and Characterization of a Novel Type of Babesia sp. (KO1) Similar to Ovine Babesia},
  author={Jung-Yeon Kim and Shin-Hyeong Cho and Hyun-Na Joo and Masayoshi Tsuji and Sung-Ran Cho and Il Joong Park and Gyung Tae Chung and Jung-Won Ju and Hyeng-Il Cheun and Hyeong-Woo Lee and Young-hee Lee and Tong-Soo Kim},
  journal={Journal of Clinical Microbiology},
  year={2007},
  volume={45},
  pages={2084 - 2087}
}
ABSTRACT We report on the first case of human babesiosis in Korea. The intraerythrocytic parasite (KO1) in the patient's blood mainly appeared as paired pyriforms and ring forms; but Maltese cross forms were not seen, and the parasite showed morphological features consistent with those of the genus Babesia sensu stricto. The sequence of the 18S rRNA gene of KO1 was closely related to that of Babesia spp. isolated from sheep in China (similarity, 98%). The present study provides the first… Expand
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