Fire ant thermal preferences: behavioral control of growth and metabolism

@article{Porter2004FireAT,
  title={Fire ant thermal preferences: behavioral control of growth and metabolism},
  author={Sanford D. Porter and Walter R. Tschinkel},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2004},
  volume={32},
  pages={321-329}
}
SummaryThermal preferences of well-fed and food-limited fire ant colonies (Solenopsis invicta) were studied in relation to colony growth and metabolic costs. The growth curve for well-fed colonies was strongly skewed toward warmer temperatures with maximal growth occurring near 32° C (Fig. 2A). The growth curve for food-limited colonies was skewed toward cooler temperatures with maximal colony size occurring around 25° C (Fig. 2B). Food-limited colonies apparently grew larger at cooler… Expand

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