Fire Mosaics in Southern California and Northern Baja California

@article{Minnich1983FireMI,
  title={Fire Mosaics in Southern California and Northern Baja California},
  author={Richard A. Minnich},
  journal={Science},
  year={1983},
  volume={219},
  pages={1287 - 1294}
}
  • R. Minnich
  • Published 18 March 1983
  • Environmental Science
  • Science
In spite of suppression efforts, severe wildfires burn large areas of southern California grassland, coastal sage scrub, and chaparral. Such large burns may not have been characteristic prior to the initiation of fire suppression more than 70 years ago. To compare controlled with uncontrolled areas, wildfires of southern California and adjacent northern Baja California were evaluated for the period 1972 to 1980 from Landsat imagery. Fire size and location, vegetation, year, and season were… 

Wildland Fire Patch Dynamics in the Chaparral of Southern California and Northern Baja California

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  • G. Malanson
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    Environmental Conservation
  • 1985
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Climate, vegetation, topography, and the pressure of cultural expansion into the wildlands combine to produce highly hazardous fire conditions in San Diego County and other Southern California

Simulating the effects of frequent fire on southern California coastal shrublands.

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Management of fire regime, fuels, and fire effects in southern California chaparral: lessons from the past and thoughts for the future

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Wildland Fire and Chaparral Succession Along the California-Baja California Boundary

Theunited States-Mexico international bound- ary from El Paso, Texas to the Pacific Coast shows clear differences in plant communities that were homogeneous prior to being split by a continuous fence

Prescribed Mosaic Burning in California Chaparral 1

fire-prone ecosystems, knowledge of previous fire history and long-term fire regimes is essential to the establishment of ecologically sound fire management. In the Californian chaparral, fire

Variations in a regional fire regime related to vegetation type in San Diego County, California (USA)

This study considers variations in a regional fire regime that are related to vegetation structure. Using a Geographic Information System, the vegetation of San Diego County, Southern coastal

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