Fire Blight Management in the Twenty-first Century: Using New Technologies that Enhance Host Resistance in Apple.

@article{Norelli2003FireBM,
  title={Fire Blight Management in the Twenty-first Century: Using New Technologies that Enhance Host Resistance in Apple.},
  author={John L Norelli and Alan L. Jones and Herb S. Aldwinckle},
  journal={Plant disease},
  year={2003},
  volume={87 7},
  pages={
          756-765
        }
}
Fire blight has been known as a destructive disease of apple and pear for over 200 years (3). The disease is caused by the bacterium Erwinia amylovora, which is capable of infecting blossoms, fruits, vegetative shoots, woody tissues, and rootstock crowns (Fig. 1). There are several distinct phases of the disease including blossom blight, shoot blight, and rootstock blight. The diversity of host tissues susceptible to infection, combined with the limited number of management tools available to… Expand
Fire blight resistance of the wild apple species Malus fusca
TLDR
This thesis describes the stability and validation of the M. fusca fire blight resistance locus (Mfu10) after another phenotypic evaluation of the F1 population with a highly virulent E. amylovora isolate Ea3049 originating from Canada. Expand
Improvement of Fire Blight Resistance in Apple and Pear
Fire blight caused by the bacterium Erwinia amylovora is known to incite substantial damage in pomefruit production. The disease originated in North America, from where it slowly spread around theExpand
Phenotypic Evaluation of Fire Blight Outbreak in the USDA Malus Collection
TLDR
The species and trees presented here, can provide insight for future genetic fire blight resistance studies, as well as help to understand the disease progression. Expand
Bacterial Strain Affects Cultivar Response to Fire Blight in Apples
Fire blight, caused by the bacterium Erwinia amylovora, is a major threat to apple and pear production in New York State. Cultivated apple varieties have varying levels of susceptibility to f ireExpand
Status of fire blight resistance breeding in Malus
TLDR
This review highlights the status of breeding for fire blight resistance in Malus, taking into account, major and minor resistance sources and their interaction with E. amylovora, progress and challenges associated with using wild species as resistance sources, and advances in biotechnology for use in enhancing the production of durable fire blight resistant cultivars. Expand
Floral traits affecting fire blight infection and management
TLDR
Flower age, stigma morphology and longevity, the size of epiphytic bacterial population, morphology of the hypanthium, anatomy of the nectary, dynamics of nectar secretion, as well as the volume, concentration and composition of thenectar are discussed in detail, comparing traits of susceptible versus tolerant apple and pear cultivars. Expand
Evaluation of host resistance inducers and conventional products for fire blight management in loquat and quince
TLDR
The use of resistance-inducing substances during the early phase of shoot growth may offer a means of managing the shoot blight phase of fire blight disease on quince and loquat. Expand
Fire Blight Resistance in Wild Accessions of Malus sieversii.
TLDR
Several accessions exhibited a unique resistance response, not previously reported in domestic apple (M. × domestica), characterized by low incidence of infection but high severity once infection was initiated. Expand
Alternative inoculum sources for fire blight: the potential role of fruit mummies and non-host plants
TLDR
The results indicate a potential role of fruit mummies and buds in overwintering and as a source of primary inoculum for dissemination of the pathogen early in the growing season. Expand
Analysis of Fire Blight Shoot Infection Epidemics on Apple.
TLDR
The binary power law provided an excellent fit to the full data set and to nearly all of the subsets and indicated that heterogeneity changed systematically with disease incidence, whereas location and seasonal factors impact heterogeneity of disease, although the specifics could not be ascertained from this study. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 64 REFERENCES
Fire Blight: The Disease and its Causative Agent, Erwinia amylovora
TLDR
Fire Blight is a bacterial disease that is particularly destructive to apple and pear trees, but which also attacks other plants, including woody ornamentals such as pyracantha or cotoneaster, and this work considers the pathogen, including its biochemistry, genetics and pathogenicity. Expand
Fire blight of pome fruits: The genesis of the concept that bacteria can be pathogenic to plants
This paper reviews American literature on fire blight disease of pomaceous fruits and presents proof that the concept of certain bacteria as a cause of plant disease was slowly developed by variousExpand
Resistance of Geneva and Other Apple Rootstocks to Erwinia amylovora.
TLDR
There was general agreement in the evaluation of resistance under orchard conditions when rootstock resistance was evaluated in relation to controlled blossom inoculation or to natural blossom infection. Expand
Acibenzolar-S-methyl Induces the Accumulation of Defense-related Enzymes in Apple and Protects from Fire Blight
TLDR
It is suggested that acibenzolar-S-methyl promotes induced systemic resistance in apple by increasing defense-related compounds and could provide a new approach of control of fire blight. Expand
Effect of Treating Apple Trees with Acibenzolar-S-Methyl on Fire Blight and Expression of Pathogenesis-Related Protein Genes.
TLDR
In general, ASM was not superior to streptomycin for fire blight control, but integrating a weekly schedule of ASM, preferably at 150 mg a.i./liter, with a schedule of strePTomycin designed for blossom blight control appears promising for overall improvement inFire blight control. Expand
Compatibility of bacterial antagonists of Erwinia amylovora with antibiotics used to control fire blight.
TLDR
Optimal integration of biological and chemical methods for suppression of fire blight, however, may require that oxytetracycline applications be delayed until after epiphytic populations of antagonists have become established on flowers. Expand
Internal Movement of Erwinia amylovora Through Symptomless Apple Scion Tissues into the Rootstock.
TLDR
Shoot tips of potted Empire and Golden Delicious trees on the susceptible dwarfing rootstock M.26 in the greenhouse were injected with inoculum containing E. amylovora, finding that late-season fire blight infections of the scion may be particularly hazardous for the health of the rootstock. Expand
Genetic engineering for resistance to bacteria in transgenic plants by introduction of foreign genes
TLDR
Compared to other types of pathogens, efforts in genetic engineering allocated to the development of resistance to phytopathogenic bacteria in transgenic plants is quite small, and work has focused mostly on potato or tobacco. Expand
Transgenic ‘Malling 26’ apple expressing the attacin E gene has increased resistance to Erwinia amylovora
TLDR
Apple (Malus domestica) transgenic T1 was obtained by Agrobacterium tumefaciens- mediated transformation of Mailing 26 rootstock using the plasmid binary vector pLDB 15 and the integration of the attacin E gene into the apple genome was confirmed by Southern analysis. Expand
Breeding Apple Rootstocks
TLDR
The 2- or 3- or 4-part tree can more easily possess diverse favorable attributes than can a fruiting cultivar on its own roots. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...