Fire As an Engineering Tool of Early Modern Humans

@article{Brown2009FireAA,
  title={Fire As an Engineering Tool of Early Modern Humans},
  author={K. S. Brown and C. Marean and A. Herries and Z. Jacobs and C. Tribolo and David Braun and D. Roberts and M. Meyer and Jocelyn Bernatchez},
  journal={Science},
  year={2009},
  volume={325},
  pages={859 - 862}
}
Friendly Fire Hints of the use of more advanced materials by humans, including symbolic marking and jewelry, appear about 75,000 years ago or so in Africa. Brown et al. (p. 859; see the Perspective by Webb and Domanski) now show that these early modern humans were also experimenting with the use of fire for improved processing of materials. Replication experiments and analysis of artifacts suggest that humans in South Africa at this time, and perhaps earlier, systematically heated stone… Expand

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