Finite groups in which the centralizer of any non-identity element is nilpotent

@article{Feit1960FiniteGI,
  title={Finite groups in which the centralizer of any non-identity element is nilpotent},
  author={Walter Feit and Marshall Hall and John G. Thompson},
  journal={Mathematische Zeitschrift},
  year={1960},
  volume={74},
  pages={1-17}
}
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A Note on Soluble Groups
Zum Satz von Sylow
THE NONEXISTENCE OF A CERTAIN TYPE OF SIMPLE GROUPS OF ODD ORDER
L. Weisner [8] has studied finite groups with this condition (W), and proved that such groups are either solvable or simple. The problem of determining the possible types of simple groups satisfying