Finite-Volume CFD Procedure and Adaptive Error Control Strategy for Grids of Arbitrary Topology

@article{Muzaferija1997FiniteVolumeCP,
  title={Finite-Volume CFD Procedure and Adaptive Error Control Strategy for Grids of Arbitrary Topology},
  author={Samir Muzaferija and David Gosman},
  journal={Journal of Computational Physics},
  year={1997},
  volume={138},
  pages={766-787}
}
This paper outlines the development and application of a solution-adaptive local grid refinement procedure for numerical fluid dynamic calculations in complex domains involving body-fitted unstructured meshes. A new space discretization practice and an error estimation technique were developed to facilitate adaptive space discretization (h-refinement) using cells of arbitrary topology. The methodology enables implicit, consistent, and uniform treatment throughout the entire computational domain… 

Solution adaptive grids applied to low Reynolds number flow

A numerical study has been undertaken to investigate the use of a solution adaptive grid for flow around a cylinder in the laminar flow regime. The main purpose of this work is twofold. The first aim

Discretization of transport equations on 2D Cartesian unstructured grids using data from remote cells for the convection terms

This paper presents a new finite volume discretization methodology for the solution of transport equations on locally refined or unstructured Cartesian meshes. The implementation of the cell‐face

Residual Least-Squares Error Estimate for Unstructured h-Adaptive Meshes

An a posteriori error estimate suitable for finite-volume adaptive computations and the adaptive refinement algorithm, which uses the information provided by the error estimate and does not require problem-dependent constants, have been presented.

A NEW RESIDUAL LEAST SQUARES ERROR ESTIMATOR FOR FINITE VOLUME METHODS – APPLICATIONS TO LAMINAR FLOWS

The main goal of the present study is to perform the mesh refinement maintaining the global spatial accuracy to a desired level in the overall computational domain.

Automatic Resolution Control for the Finite-Volume Method, Part 2: Adaptive Mesh Refinement and Coarsening

This article describes an automatic adaptive h-type mesh refinement and coarsening procedure with directional sensitivity, based on the estimated error and solution gradients, and its error reduction rate and the quality of refined meshes.

A-posteriori error estimation for the finite point method with applications to compressible flow

An a-posteriori error estimate with application to inviscid compressible flow problems is presented. The estimate is a surrogate measure of the discretization error, obtained from an approximation to

INFLUENCE OF NUMERICAL MESH PROPERTIES ON DISCRETIZATION ERROR

The methodology is used to study the influence of mesh uniformity and orthogonality on the accuracy of the gradient approximations based onGauss method, Gauss method with corrections and a least square method.

A Piecewise Linear Interface-Capturing Volume-of-Fluid Method Based on Unstructured Grids

A piecewise linear interface calculation (PLIC) technique on triangular unstructured grids is proposed for the volume-of-fluid (VOF) method. For an interface cell, a straight line segment is set to
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 46 REFERENCES

Overlapping grids and multigrid methods for three‐dimensional unsteady flow calculations in IC engines

The main feature of the present overlapping-grid system is of extended flexibility to deal with three-dimensional complex multicomponent geometries and the multigrid method is incorporated into this technique to accelerate the convergence of the numerical solution.

A coupled multigrid‐domain‐splitting technique for simulating incompressible flows in geometrically complex domains

The ability to simulate complex flow fields with the domain decomposition numerical procedure provides a powerful tool for analysis and prediction of mixing and transport phenomenon.

A collocated finite volume method for predicting flows at all speeds

An existing two-dimensional method for the prediction of steady-state incompressible flows in complex geometry is extended to treat also compressible flows at all speeds. The primary variables are

Basic advances in the finite-volume method for transonic potential flow calculations

The finite-volume methods of Jameson and Caughey [4.8,4.9,4.212] provide a general framework within which it is fairly easy to calculate the transonic potential flow past essentially arbitrary