Fingerprints, sex, state, and the organization of the Tell Leilan ceramic industry

@article{Sanders2015FingerprintsSS,
  title={Fingerprints, sex, state, and the organization of the Tell Leilan ceramic industry},
  author={Akiva Sanders},
  journal={Journal of Archaeological Science},
  year={2015},
  volume={57},
  pages={223-238}
}
  • Akiva Sanders
  • Published 1 May 2015
  • History
  • Journal of Archaeological Science

Analysis of fingerprints on a PPNB figurine from the Tell Halula site, Syria

With the advent of the Neolithic, the first manipulation of clay for various purposes was observed. Fingerprints could be imprinted due to the plastic properties of clay. Their study and analysis can

The Identity of Potters in Early States: Determining the Age and Sex of Fingerprints on Early Bronze Age Pottery from Tell eṣ-Ṣâfi/Gath, Israel

The organization of craft production has long been a marker for broader social, economic, and political changes that accompanied urbanism. The identity of producers who comprised production groups,

The Identity of Potters in Early States: Determining the Age and Sex of Fingerprints on Early Bronze Age Pottery from Tell eṣ-Ṣâfi/Gath, Israel

The organization of craft production has long been a marker for broader social, economic, and political changes that accompanied urbanism. The identity of producers who comprised production groups,

Age and sex determination of fingerprints on ceramic objects from the Late Bronze Age palace at Tel Beth-Shemesh, Israel

Who made figurines for ritual feasting in the Late Bronze Age (LBA) palace at Tel Beth-Shemesh? This article attempts to answer this question by determining the age and sex of fingerprints on five

Fingerprint evidence for the division of labour and learning pottery-making at Early Bronze Age Tell eṣ-Ṣâfi/Gath, Israel

This analysis combines mean ridge breadth (MRB) and mean ridge density (MRD) to distinguish the age and sex of 112 fingerprints on Early Bronze Age (EB) III pottery from the early urban neighbourhood at Tell eṣ-Ṣâfi/Gath, Israel, dating to a 100 year time span.

Reconstructing sexual divisions of labor from fingerprints on Ancestral Puebloan pottery

The fingerprint evidence demonstrates that both males and females were significantly involved in pottery production and further suggests that the contributions of each sex varied over time and even among different social groups in the same community.

Who Made the White Gold? Exploring the Demographics of Iron Age Salt Production in England through Fingerprint Analysis

Ancient fingerprints preserved in clay artefacts can provide demographic information about the people who handled and manufactured them, leaving their marks as an accidental record of a moment’s

The Dipylon Mistress: Social and Economic Complexity, the Gendering of Craft Production, and Early Greek Ceramic Material Culture

This article considers the role of changing contexts of production in the evolution of ceramic material culture in early Greece. Rather than focusing on the aesthetics of ceramics or reading

The Study of Three-Dimensional Fingerprint Recognition in Cultural Heritage

The aim is to outline the opportunities and challenges of digital fingerprint recognition in answering a range of questions in cultural heritage research and analyze the works conducted on ancient fingerprints from potteries and ceramic/fired clay sculptures to suggest that the study of ancient fingerprints can be further investigated and open new avenues of research.

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 70 REFERENCES

The Standardization Hypothesis and Ceramic Mass Production: Technological, Compositional, and Metric Indexes of Craft Specialization at Tell Leilan, Syria

Archaeologists often use measurements of standardization in ceramics as evidence for specialized craft production. Analysis of fine-ware bowl kiln wasters from the urban center of Leilan, Syria (ca.

The Archaeological Present: Near Eastern Village Potters at Work

  • F. Matson
  • History
    American Journal of Archaeology
  • 1974
Potters working in villages today are rapidly diminishing in number, so an adequate record of their craft practices must be made now if the contemporary ceramic record is to serve archaeologists who

Fingerprints on Early Minoan pottery: a pilot study

A pilot project was carried out to assess the frequency of surviving fingerprints on Early Minoan pottery and to assess the quality of the prints. Two pottery assemblages, from the Ayia Kyriaki

Textile Extensification, Alienation, and Social Stratification in Ancient Mesopotamia1

One of the most significant transformations in the emergence of economically and socially complex societies has been the development of social groups with differential access to productive resources.

Identification of Wheel-fashioning Methods: Technological Analysis of 4th–3rdMillenniumBCOriental Ceramics

Abstract In Oriental Asia, during the 4 th –3 rd millennium BC , clay vessels were not wheel-thrown but wheel-shaped. This technique, which combines coiling and wheel-shaping, can be achieved by four

Is there a gender difference in fingerprint ridge density?

  • M. Acree
  • Biology
    Forensic science international
  • 1999

Discovering Childhood: Using Fingerprints to Find Children in the Archaeological Record

Experimental replications show that ridge breadth measurements from fingerprints on archaeological artifacts can be used to estimate the age of the individual who produced the prints. While the

Early Urbanism on the Syrian Euphrates

Studying archaeological evidence from sites covering over 200 kilometres of the banks of the Euphrates River, Lisa Cooper's excellent monograph explores the growth and development of human settlement

The Dynamics of Death: Ancestors, Pastoralism, and the Origins of a Third-Millennium City in Syria

  • A. Porter
  • Sociology
    Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research
  • 2002
The rituals and practices associated with death are significant sources of social relationships beyond only issues of status. In the ancient Near East, mortuary practices created ancestors, evident

Sex Determination from Fingerprint Ridge Density

It has been successful to support the hypothesis that women tend to have a statistically significant greater ridge density than men.
...