Finger cold-induced vasodilation: a review

@article{Daanen2003FingerCV,
  title={Finger cold-induced vasodilation: a review},
  author={Hein A. M. Daanen},
  journal={European Journal of Applied Physiology},
  year={2003},
  volume={89},
  pages={411-426}
}
  • H. Daanen
  • Published 24 April 2003
  • Medicine
  • European Journal of Applied Physiology
Cold-induced vasodilation (CIVD) in the finger tips generally occurs 5–10 min after the start of local cold exposure of the extremities. This phenomenon is believed to reduce the risk of local cold injuries. However, CIVD is almost absent during hypothermia, when survival of the organism takes precedence over the survival of peripheral tissue. Subjects that are often exposed to local cold (e.g. fish filleters) develop an enhanced CIVD response. Also, differences between ethnic groups are… 

Effect of body temperature on cold induced vasodilation

It is concluded that CIVD is triggered by increased Tb supporting the hypothesis that CivD is a thermoregulatory mechanism contributing to heat loss.

Cold-induced vasodilatation in the foot is not homogenous or trainable over repeated cold exposure

It is concluded that, under realistic conditions of whole-foot immersion in cold water, CIVD is not a common or trainable response.

Cold-induced vasodilatation is not homogenous or generalizable across the hand and feet

It is concluded that CIVD is highly variable across the fingers, and is not a generalizable response across digits or limbs.

Relation between finger cold-induced vasodilation and rewarming speed after cold exposure

The predictive value of the rewarming test for cold injuries is limited, cannot replace the RIF, and may be explained by the common observation that onset time relates to the temperature of fingertip tissue, while Tmin, Tmean and rewarming speed relates to body thermal status.

Cold-induced vasodilatation in cold-intolerant rats after nerve injury.

Cold-induced vasodilation during continuous exercise in the extreme cold air (-30.6 °c)

Individual variations of finger CIVD in relation to the core and mean skin temperatures during continuous exercise in the extreme cold air (-30.6 °C) are investigated.

Cardiovascular Stress and Characteristics of Cold-Induced Vasodilation in Women and Men during Cold-Water Immersion: A Randomized Control Study

Cold-induced vasodilation responses between women and men, during exposure to different environmental conditions demonstrated that women experienced elevated cardiovascular strain and higher frequency of CIVD reactions, particularly in the toes, compared to their male counterparts during cold-water immersion.

Single-digit cold-induced vasodilation adaptations during an Antarctic expedition

Of interest to Polar Region visitors, beneficial peripheral and perceptual adaptations to prolonged Antarctic exposure can occur with 2 h of daily outdoor exposure although the rates at which adaptation occurs differ.
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References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 141 REFERENCES

Cold‐induced vasodilatation in various areas of the body surface of man

The purpose of the present study was to map out the distribution of the cold-induced vasodilatation response over the body surface to indicate the presence of a particular vascular structure.

Finger cold-induced vasodilation during mild hypothermia, hyperthermia and at thermoneutrality.

It was concluded that the CIVD response is significantly affected by body core and skin temperatures.

Perfusion of the human finger during cold-induced vasodilatation.

The results demonstrate that the initial cold-induced vasoconstriction during severe local cooling involves constriction of the AVAs as well as the two main arteries supplying this finger, which indicates that the large blood flow to the finger and the high skin temperature during CIVD are caused by relaxation of the smooth muscle cells of theAVAs.

Perfusion of the human finger during cold-induced vasodilatation.

The results demonstrate that the initial cold-induced vasoconstriction during severe local cooling involves constriction of the AVAs as well as the two main arteries supplying this finger, which indicates that the large blood flow to the finger and the high skin temperature during CIVD are caused by relaxation of the smooth muscle cells of theAVAs.

Cold-induced vasodilatation response of finger skin blood vessels in older men observed by using a modified local cold tolerance test.

Considering the fact that no subjects complained a great deal of cold pain during the immersion, the modified localcold tolerance test seems to be a useful method for detecting the age-related degradation of local cold tolerance and peripheral vascular reactivity in older workers.

Cold-induced vasodilatation and peripheral blood flow under local cold stress in man at altitude.

The cold-induced vasodilatation (CIVD) response was studied on 17 lowlanders at Delhi, and responses of the acclimatized lowlanders were better than the fresh inductees, but much less than the natives.

Cold-induced peripheral vasodilation at high altitudes--a field study.

It can be concluded that no acclimatization effects of CIVD occur during the first 7 days of altitude exposure, but that differences may occur after altitude exposure of several weeks.

Influence of food intake on cold-induced vasodilatation of finger.

The results suggest that the central process is so sensitive as to operate in a 15% increase in heat load into the body, in support of the involvement of the central nervous system control in CIVD.

Axon Reflexes in cold-exposed fingers

An experiment was set up to investigate the involvement of axon reflexes in CIVD, and electrically evoked axon Reflexes during cold-water immersion of a hand in 3 different thermal states of the body: hypothermia, hyperthermia and at thermoneutrality.

Sympathetic stimulation induced by hand cooling alters cold-induced vasodilatation in humans

The results showed that CIVD could be altered by sympathetic stimulation but it also appeared that the onset of CIVd could be influenced by local cooling, independently of the general sympathetic stimulation.
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