Fine‐scale genetic structure in a free‐living ungulate population

@article{Coltman2003FinescaleGS,
  title={Fine‐scale genetic structure in a free‐living ungulate population},
  author={D W Coltman and J. G. Pilkington and JM Pemberton},
  journal={Molecular Ecology},
  year={2003},
  volume={12}
}
The fine‐scale genetic structure of wild animal populations has rarely been analysed, yet is potentially important as a confounding factor in quantitative genetic and allelic association studies, as well as having implications for population dynamics, inbreeding and kin selection. In this study, we examined the extent to which the three spatial subunits, or hefts, of the Village Bay population of Soay sheep (Ovis aries) on St Kilda, Scotland, are genetically structured using data from 20… Expand
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