Finding the Self? An Event-Related fMRI Study

@article{Kelley2002FindingTS,
  title={Finding the Self? An Event-Related fMRI Study},
  author={William M. Kelley and C. Neil Macrae and C. L. Wyland and Selinay Çağlar and Souheil J. Inati and Todd F. Heatherton},
  journal={Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience},
  year={2002},
  volume={14},
  pages={785-794}
}
Researchers have long debated whether knowledge about the self is unique in terms of its functional anatomic representation within the human brain. In the context of memory function, knowledge about the self is typically remembered better than other types of semantic information. But why does this memorial effect emerge? Extending previous research on this topic (see Craik et al., 1999), the present study used event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate potential neural… Expand

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