Corpus ID: 30383650

Finding meaning, balance, and personal satisfaction in the practice of oncology.

@article{Shanafelt2005FindingMB,
  title={Finding meaning, balance, and personal satisfaction in the practice of oncology.},
  author={Tait D. Shanafelt},
  journal={The journal of supportive oncology},
  year={2005},
  volume={3 2},
  pages={
          157-62, 164
        }
}
  • T. Shanafelt
  • Published 2005
  • Medicine
  • The journal of supportive oncology
T raining for and practicing the specialty of medical oncology are stressful endeavors. During the training process, future oncologists often cope with their stress by assuming that “things will get better” after they complete residency and fellowship. This myth often leads physicians to sacrifice many of the personal values and activities that give life meaning. It also may perpetuate a philosophy of delayed gratification that leads to a loss of balance between personal and professional lives… Expand
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