Finding Opinion Manipulation Trolls in News Community Forums

@inproceedings{Mihaylov2015FindingOM,
  title={Finding Opinion Manipulation Trolls in News Community Forums},
  author={Todor Mihaylov and Georgi Georgiev and Preslav Nakov},
  booktitle={CoNLL},
  year={2015}
}
The emergence of user forums in electronic news media has given rise to the proliferation of opinion manipulation trolls. Finding such trolls automatically is a hard task, as there is no easy way to recognize or even to define what they are; this also makes it hard to get training and testing data. We solve this issue pragmatically: we assume that a user who is called a troll by several people is likely to be one. We experiment with different variations of this definition, and in each case we… Expand

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