Finding Meaning in the Past: Reinterpretation of the Late Roman Artifact, the Golden Ring with a Carnelian Intaglio from the Museum of Georgia

@article{Avaliani2019FindingMI,
  title={Finding Meaning in the Past: Reinterpretation of the Late Roman Artifact, the Golden Ring with a Carnelian Intaglio from the Museum of Georgia},
  author={Eka Avaliani},
  journal={$\Sigma$ΧΟ$\Lambda$Η. Ancient Philosophy and the Classical Tradition},
  year={2019}
}
  • Eka Avaliani
  • Published 2019
  • History
  • ΣΧΟΛΗ. Ancient Philosophy and the Classical Tradition
This paper offers a novel interpretation of the luxury golden ring with a carnelian intaglio depicting a woman's profile and an engraved Greek inscription, ΒΑCIΛICCΑ ΟΥΛΠIAΝΑ(Ζ)IA (or AΣIA E.A.), found in cist grave 14, in Mtskheta, Georgia, dated to the Roman period, the 3rd century AD. In consideration of the then contemporary political situation in the Mediterranean and Roman East, through the putting and interpreting sources into broad historical context, the author identifies the female… 

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 14 REFERENCES

Roman Syria and the Near East

"Roman Syria" includes some of the most famous and spectacular ruins of the ancient world Palmyra, Baalbek and Apamea and fabled cities such as Antioch, Damascus, Sidon and Tyre. Yet there are many

Aurelian and the third century

Aurelian and the Third Century provides a re-evaluation, in the light of recent scholarship, of the difficulties facing the Roman empire in the AD 260s and 270s, concentrating upon the reign of the

The making of the Georgian nation

Preface to the Second Edition Preface Note on Transliteration and Dating Part One The Rise and Fall of the Georgian Monarchies 1 The Formation of the Georgian Nation 2 Christian Georgia: The First

Graecia Capta: The Landscapes of Roman Greece

1. The problem of Roman Greece 2. The rural landscape 3. The civic landscape 4. The provincial landscape 5. The sacred landscape 6. Greece within the empire Notes Bibliography Index.

The Emperor, The Senate and the Provinces

Our sources for the constitutional settlement and division of the provinces in 27 B.C., and the modification of the settlement in 23 B.C., are notoriously brief and inadequate. Neither Augustus in

ARTEMIS