Financial Hardship Associated With Cancer in the United States: Findings From a Population-Based Sample of Adult Cancer Survivors.

@article{Yabroff2016FinancialHA,
  title={Financial Hardship Associated With Cancer in the United States: Findings From a Population-Based Sample of Adult Cancer Survivors.},
  author={K. Robin Yabroff and Emily C. Dowling and Gery P. Guy and Matthew P. Banegas and Amy J. Davidoff and Xuesong Han and Katherine S. Virgo and Timothy S. McNeel and Neetu Chawla and Danielle Blanch-Hartigan and Erin E. Kent and Chunyu Li and Juan L. Rodriguez and Janet S. de Moor and Zhiyuan Zheng and Ahmedin Jemal and Donatus U. Ekwueme},
  journal={Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology},
  year={2016},
  volume={34 3},
  pages={
          259-67
        }
}
PURPOSE To estimate the prevalence of financial hardship associated with cancer in the United States and identify characteristics of cancer survivors associated with financial hardship. METHODS We identified 1,202 adult cancer survivors diagnosed or treated at ≥ 18 years of age from the 2011 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey Experiences With Cancer questionnaire. Material financial hardship was measured by ever (1) borrowing money or going into debt, (2) filing for bankruptcy, (3) being unable… 

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