Figures and institutions of the neurological sciences in Paris from 1800 to 1950. Part III: neurology.

@article{Broussolle2012FiguresAI,
  title={Figures and institutions of the neurological sciences in Paris from 1800 to 1950. Part III: neurology.},
  author={Emmanuel Broussolle and Jacques Poirier and François Clarac and J. G. Barbara},
  journal={Revue neurologique},
  year={2012},
  volume={168 4},
  pages={
          301-20
        }
}
André Léri (1875–1930 AD) and his legacy to neuroscience
TLDR
A unique test, which is still used today, for the diagnosis of L3-L4 nerve compression, the so-called BLéri’s sign is proposed, which made Paris a renowned center of neurology.
History of Neurology Jules and Augusta Dejerine , Pierre Marie , Joseph Babiński , Georges Guillain and their students during World
World War I (1914–1918), however tragic, was nonetheless an ‘‘edifying school of nervous system experimental pathology’’ not only because of the various types of injuries, but also because their
French school of neurology in the 19th and first half of the 20th century, and its influence in Brazil.
TLDR
French medicine offered professional training and incentives for the beginnings of Brazilian neurology and psychiatry in the 19th century, and many Brazilian physicians implemented what they had learned, mainly in Paris.
Jean-Louis Brachet (1789-1858). A forgotten contributor to early 19th century neurology.
Georges Guillain and their students during World War
World War I (1914–1918), however tragic, was nonetheless an ‘‘edifying school of nervous system experimental pathology’’ not only because of the various types of injuries, but also because their
Jean-Martin Charcot, father of modern neurology: an homage 120 years after his death.
TLDR
The link of this anatomoclinical method with iconographic representations and theatrical lessons, and the rich bibliographical documentations were the basis of his achievements, which are still discussed 120 years after his death.
Who was Pierre Marie?
TLDR
A tribute to Pierre Marie (1853-1940), highlighting his great contribution to medicine and neurology describing several diseases and syndromes and aspects of his personal life and personality traits.
...
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 427 REFERENCES
Chapter 40: history of neurology in France.
The discovery of encephalic arteries. From Johann Jacob Wepfer to Charles Foix.
TLDR
It was only at the end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th century that discoveries about encephalic arteries had gained ground, and this period saw the advent of the first generation of vascular neurologists, one of whom is considered as the founder of the discipline.
Jean-Martin Charcot (1825-1893): pathologist who shaped modern neurology.
TLDR
Jean-Martin Charcot was a pathologist by instinct and training, and like most French physicians, relied on the anatomoclinical method, but his approach, the basis for the modern day clinico-pathological conference, emphasised the correlation between clinical manifestations and post-mortem events.
The First Modern Stroke Neurologist
TLDR
Charles Foix came to Paris to study medicine and spent his entire career within the hospital systems of Paris (Hotel-Dieu, Necker, Bicetre, Salpetriere), and during his fourth year of training he won the Gold Medal Competition, a very coveted and prestigious award.
The `Dejerines': an historical review and homage to two pioneers in the field of neurology and their contribution to the understanding of spinal cord pathology
Our purpose, in this number of Spinal Cord devoted to the French speaking Society of Paraplegia (AFIGAP), is to render homage to two very distinguished doctors, who by their work at the end of the
The Discovery of Encephalic Arteries
TLDR
It was only at the end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th century that discoveries about encephalic arteries had gained ground, and this period saw the advent of the first generation of vascular neurologists, one of whom is considered as the founder of the discipline.
The third left frontal convolution plays no role in language
TLDR
Pierre Marie (1853-1940) was the only child of a bourgeois couple who lived in the fashionable “premier arrondissement” of Paris and wrote on the possible infectious etiology of multiple sclerosis and e p i l e p ~ y.
François Magendie (1783-1855) and his contributions to the foundations of neuroscience and neurosurgery.
TLDR
This trained surgeon is known to have used Galvanic current to treat various neuralgias, described a technique for extracting cerebrospinal fluid and quantitated and described its characteristics in normal and pathological specimens, and elucidated the functions of the cranial nerves using vivisection.
André-Thomas (1867–1963)
1867, where he died 97 years later in 1963. The hyphen between his name and surname is an enigmatic and personal choice, as was the early abandonment of his additional baptismal names Antoine and
Georges Marinesco and the early research in neuropathology
TLDR
Georges Marinesco was a prolific researcher in the field of neuropathology, especially neurodegeneration but also in clinical neurology, and is now considered the founder of the modern Romanian school of neurology.
...
...