Fifty years of evolution of the term Down's syndrome

@article{RodrguezHernndez2011FiftyYO,
  title={Fifty years of evolution of the term Down's syndrome},
  author={M Luisa Rodr{\'i}guez-Hern{\'a}ndez and Eladio Montoya},
  journal={The Lancet},
  year={2011},
  volume={378}
}

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