Fifty Years Later: Access to Education as an Avenue out of Poverty

@article{Kilty2015FiftyYL,
  title={Fifty Years Later: Access to Education as an Avenue out of Poverty},
  author={Keith M. Kilty},
  journal={Journal of Poverty},
  year={2015},
  volume={19},
  pages={324 - 329}
}
  • K. Kilty
  • Published 3 July 2015
  • Education
  • Journal of Poverty
The Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESA) of 1965 was intended to ensure access to a quality education for low-income and minority children. President Lyndon B. Johnson, a teacher himself at the beginning of his career, saw education as a critical avenue out of poverty. The Higher Education Act (HEA) of 1965 was intended to do the same for college and university education. Unfortunately, fifty years later the foundation of these important pieces of legislation has been eroded through… 

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