Field energetics and the estimation of pollen and nectar intake in the marsupial honey possum, Tarsipes rostratus, in heathland habitats of South-Western Australia

@article{Bradshaw1999FieldEA,
  title={Field energetics and the estimation of pollen and nectar intake in the marsupial honey possum, Tarsipes rostratus, in heathland habitats of South-Western Australia},
  author={S. Donald Bradshaw and Felicity Bradshaw},
  journal={Journal of Comparative Physiology B},
  year={1999},
  volume={169},
  pages={569-580}
}
Abstract A method is described, based on the simultaneous turnover of both stable (18O) and radioactive isotopes (3H and 22Na), whereby the daily nectar and pollen intake of free-ranging marsupial honey possums (Tarsipes rostratus) may be estimated. The field metabolic rate is measured using doubly labelled water and nectar intake is estimated independently from the measured water and sodium fluxes. The method assumes that free-water intake is negligible (but may be accounted for if not the… 
ISOTOPIC MEASUREMENTS OF FIELD METABOLIC RATE (FMR) IN THE MARSUPIAL HONEY POSSUM (TARSIPES ROSTRATUS)
TLDR
It is suggested that further research measuring the kbs of radioisotopes such as 86Rb in other species may lead to viable alternatives for the measurement of FMRs in very small mammals with high rates of metabolism and water turnover.
Metabolic, hygric and ventilatory physiology of a hypermetabolic marsupial, the honey possum (Tarsipes rostratus)
TLDR
This work re-examined the basal metabolic rate of the honey possum and confirms that it is indeed higher (162%) than predicted for other marsupials both before and after accounting for phylogenetic history.
The physiology of the honey possum, Tarsipes rostratus, a small marsupial with a suite of highly specialised characters: a review
Field and laboratory studies of the iconic nectarivorous and ‘pollenivorous’ honey possum, Tarsipes rostratus, are reviewed with the aim of identifying aspects of its physiology that are as yet
Reproduction and embryonic diapause in a marsupial: insights from captive female Honey possums, Tarsipes rostratus (Tarsipedidae).
TLDR
Results from studying Honey possums in captive conditions suggest that the control of diapause in Tarsipes appears to be three-fold; lactational, photoperiodic and an entrained rhythm, and September and October are months of peak reproductive activity in the wild and it is suggested that these hormonal modulations may represent an entraining rhythm.
Measurement of the rate of protein turnover and synthesis in the marsupial Honey possum (Tarsipes rostratus)
TLDR
Calculations indicate that the daily fraction of the female’s nitrogen synthesis rate that needs to be diverted to pouch young to sustain their growth is less than 5%, and may not be detectable with the current methodology.
Reproduction and embryonic diapause in a marsupial: Insights from captive female Honey possums, Tarsipes rostratus (Tarsipedidae)
TLDR
Results from studying Honey possums in captive conditions suggest that the control of diapause in Tarsipes appears to be three-fold; lactational, photoperiodic and an entrained rhythm; September and October are months of peak reproductive activity in the wild and it is suggested that these hormonal modulations may represent an ent trained reproductive rhythm.
The mating system and reproduction in the honey possum, Tarsipes rostratus: a life-history and genetical perspective
TLDR
Analysis of the densities and structure of the honey possum populations in the FRNP revealed extremely high levels of variation, with 28 to 50 alleles per locus and a mean expected heterozygosity of 0.95, amongst the highest seen in any microsatellite study of vertebrates.
The influence of photoperiod on the reproductive activity of female Honey possums, Tarsipes rostratus (Marsupialia: Tarsipedidae): assessed by faecal progestagens and oestradiol-17beta.
TLDR
It is demonstrated that a change from long to short days stimulates increased progestagen output (and oestradiol-17beta to a lesser extent) that supports the growth and expansion of the blastocysts in the Honey possum.
Short-term movements and habitat use of the marsupial honey possum (Tarsipes rostratus)
TLDR
The data suggest that honey possums frequent plant assemblages at night where they are vulnerable to pitfall trapping, but that males, particularly, spend the day in other areas that may be as far as 200 m distant.
Field metabolic rates of phytophagous bats: do pollination strategies of plants make life of nectar-feeders spin faster?
TLDR
It is hypothesized that the foraging effort per energy reward is higher for nectar-feeding mammals than for fruit-eating mammals, since energy rewards at flowering plants are smaller than those at fruiting plants.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 58 REFERENCES
Banksia pollen as a source of protein in the diet of two Australian marsupials Cercartetus nanus and Tarsipes rostratus
TLDR
Evidence is presented for the utilization of pollen by several Australian marsupials and the mechanisms behind protoplast extraction in other pollen feeding animals are discussed.
Field Metabolic Rate of a Small Marsupial Mammal, the Honey Possum (Tarsipes rostratus)
TLDR
Measurements of field metabolic rates and water influx rates in free-ranging honey possums during late winter in Western Australia indicated that these nectarivores had lower daily energy expenditures than did insectivorous, dasyurid marsupials of similar body mass.
Nitrogen Requirements of the Sugar Glider (Petaurus breviceps), an Omnivorous Marsupial, on a Honey-Pollen Diet
TLDR
Sugar gliders maintained body weight and nitrogen balance on a honey-pollen diet containing only 5.0 mg N · g DMI⁻¹, the lowest yet recorded for a marsupial, providing further evidence for more efficient recycling of amino acids by marsupials.
Field Energetics and Water Balance of Sugar Gliders, Petaurus Breviceps (Marsupialia:Petauridae).
TLDR
Doubly labelled water measurements in free-ranging sugar gliders (Petaurus breviceps) indicated that field metabolic rates (FMRS) averaged 62.5 litres CO2/kg daily, equivalent to 169 kJ per animal daily, suggesting that gliding affords sugar glider a considerable energetic saving.
Energy and Water Budgets in Free-Living Antechinus stuartii (Marsupialia:Dasyuridae)
TLDR
Results indicate that field animals obtain much more water than they need to maintain water balance, and energy expenditures of A. stuartii were similar to those of several free-living, small eutherians, after accounting for differences in ambient temperature and body size.
The relationship between nectar supply and the rate of capture of a nectar‐dependent small marsupial Tarsipes rostratus
TLDR
Changes in the population density of the short-lived Tursipes appeared directly related to changes in nectar levels through differential survival, rather than by migration or fecundity.
Diet and feeding strategies of the marsupial sugar glider in temperate Australia.
TLDR
Glider population density is probably regulated by the abundance of plant exudates available during winter, and the most important insects in the diet were species of pasture pest that have larval stages which develop in pastures adjacent to the study area, and adult stages that are dependent upon eucalypts for food and shelter.
The Maintenance Nitrogen Requirements of the Queensland Blossom Bat (Syconycteris australis) on a Sugar/Pollen Diet: Is Nitrogen a Limiting Resource?
  • B. Law
  • Biology
    Physiological Zoology
  • 1992
TLDR
The Queensland blossom bat (Syconycteris australis) is a specialist nectar and pollen feeder and its dietary maintenance nitrogen requirement was 337 mg N · kg−0.75 · d−1.75, similar to nitrogen requirements predicted from the standard metabolic rate of blossom bats.
SCALING OF ENERGY AND WATER FLUXES IN FREE-LIVING ARID-ZONE AUSTRALIAN MARSUPIALS
TLDR
The remarkably similar reduction in daily energy and water needs of arid vs nonarid Australian marsupials, compared with arid versus nonarids North American and African eutherians, suggests that this similarity is an example of convergent evolution.
Bird and Mammal Pollen Vectors in Banksia Communities at Cheyne Beach, Western Australia
TLDR
It was found that the two dominant banksias had divergent floral characteristics, some of which previous authors had suggested were adaptations to either bird or mammal pollination, and that B. occidentalis transferred more pollen to vertebrate vectors and set more seed per inflorescence than did B. baxteri.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...