Fidelity Among Sirex Woodwasps and Their Fungal Symbionts

@article{Hajek2013FidelityAS,
  title={Fidelity Among Sirex Woodwasps and Their Fungal Symbionts},
  author={A. Hajek and C. Nielsen and R. Kepler and S. J. Long and L. Castrillo},
  journal={Microbial Ecology},
  year={2013},
  volume={65},
  pages={753 - 762}
}
We report that associations between mutualistic fungi and their economically and ecologically important woodwasp hosts are not always specific as was previously assumed. Woodwasps in the genus Sirex engage in obligate nutritional ectosymbioses with two species of Amylostereum, a homobasid\iomycete genus of white rot fungi. In the present study, the Amylostereum species and genotypes associated with three species of Sirex native to eastern North America and one relatively recent invasive Sirex… Expand
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