Fever in the critically ill medical patient

@article{Laupland2009FeverIT,
  title={Fever in the critically ill medical patient},
  author={Kevin B. Laupland},
  journal={Critical Care Medicine},
  year={2009},
  volume={37},
  pages={S273-S278}
}
  • K. Laupland
  • Published 1 July 2009
  • Medicine
  • Critical Care Medicine
Fever, commonly defined by a temperature of ≥38.3°C (101°F), occurs in approximately one half of patients admitted to intensive care units. Fever may be attributed to both infectious and noninfectious causes, and its development in critically ill adult medical patients is associated with an increased risk for death. Although it is widespread and clinically accepted practice to therapeutically lower temperature in patients with hyperthermic syndromes, patients with marked hyperpyrexia, and… 
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