Fetal testosterone and autistic traits.

@article{Auyeung2009FetalTA,
  title={Fetal testosterone and autistic traits.},
  author={Bonnie Auyeung and Simon Baron-Cohen and Emma Ashwin and Rebecca C. Knickmeyer and Kevin Taylor and Gerald Hackett},
  journal={British journal of psychology},
  year={2009},
  volume={100 Pt 1},
  pages={
          1-22
        }
}
Studies of amniotic testosterone in humans suggest that fetal testosterone (fT) is related to specific (but not all) sexually dimorphic aspects of cognition and behaviour. It has also been suggested that autism may be an extreme manifestation of some male-typical traits, both in terms of cognition and neuroanatomy. In this paper, we examine the possibility of a link between autistic traits and fT levels measured in amniotic fluid during routine amniocentesis. Two instruments measuring number of… 

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