Fetal Microchimerism in the Maternal Mouse Brain: A Novel Population of Fetal Progenitor or Stem Cells Able to Cross the Blood–Brain Barrier?

@article{Tan2005FetalMI,
  title={Fetal Microchimerism in the Maternal Mouse Brain: A Novel Population of Fetal Progenitor or Stem Cells Able to Cross the Blood–Brain Barrier?},
  author={Xiao Wei Tan and Hong Liao and Li Sun and Masaru Okabe and Zhi‐cheng Xiao and Gavin Stewart Dawe},
  journal={STEM CELLS},
  year={2005},
  volume={23}
}
We investigated whether fetal cells can enter the maternal brain during pregnancy. Female wild‐type C57BL/6 mice were crossed with transgenic Green Mice ubiquitously expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Green Mouse fetal cells were found in the maternal brain. Quantitative real‐time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of genomic DNA for the EGFP gene showed that more fetal cells were present in the maternal brain 4 weeks postpartum than on the day of parturition. After an… 
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Feto-maternal cell trafficking
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