Ferumoxytol: A New Intravenous Iron Preparation for the Treatment of Iron Deficiency Anemia in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

@article{Schwenk2010FerumoxytolAN,
  title={Ferumoxytol: A New Intravenous Iron Preparation for the Treatment of Iron Deficiency Anemia in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease},
  author={Michael H. Schwenk},
  journal={Pharmacotherapy: The Journal of Human Pharmacology and Drug Therapy},
  year={2010},
  volume={30}
}
  • M. H. Schwenk
  • Published 1 January 2010
  • Medicine
  • Pharmacotherapy: The Journal of Human Pharmacology and Drug Therapy
Ferumoxytol is an intravenous iron preparation for treatment of the anemia of chronic kidney disease (CKD). It is a carbohydrate‐coated, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle. Because little free iron is present in the preparation, doses of 510 mg have been administered safely in as little as 17 seconds. Two prospective, randomized studies compared two doses of ferumoxytol 510 mg given in 5 ± 3 days with 3 weeks of oral iron 200 mg/day (as ferrous fumarate) in anemic patients with CKD. One… 
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