Fertilizing the Amazon and equatorial Atlantic with West African dust

@article{Bristow2010FertilizingTA,
  title={Fertilizing the Amazon and equatorial Atlantic with West African dust},
  author={Charles S Bristow and Karen A. Hudson-Edwards and Adrian Chappell},
  journal={Geophysical Research Letters},
  year={2010},
  volume={37}
}
Atmospheric mineral dust plays a vital role in Earth's climate and biogeochemical cycles. The Bodélé Depression in Chad has been identified as the single biggest source of atmospheric mineral dust on Earth. Dust eroded from the Bodélé is blown across the Atlantic Ocean towards South America. The mineral dust contains micronutrients such as Fe and P that have the potential to act as a fertilizer, increasing primary productivity in the Amazon rain forest as well as the equatorial Atlantic Ocean… 

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