Fermi-LAT Observations of the Gamma-Ray Burst GRB 130427A

@article{Ackermann2014FermiLATOO,
  title={Fermi-LAT Observations of the Gamma-Ray Burst GRB 130427A},
  author={Markus Ackermann and Marco Ajello and Katsuaki Asano and William B. Atwood and Magnus Axelsson and Luca Baldini and Jean Ballet and Guido Barbiellini and Matthew G. Baring and Denis Bastieri and Keith C. Bechtol and Ronaldo Bellazzini and Elisabetta Bissaldi and Emanuele Bonamente and Johan Bregeon and Monica Brigida and Pascal Bruel and Rolf Buehler and J Michael Burgess and Sara Buson and G. A. Caliandro and R. A. Cameron and Patrizia A. Caraveo and Claudia Cecchi and Vandiver Chaplin and E. Charles and A. Chekhtman and C. C. Cheung and James Chiang and Graziano Chiaro and Stefano Ciprini and Richard O. Claus and William H. Cleveland and J. Cohen-Tanugi and Andrew C. Collazzi and Lynn R. Cominsky and Valerie Connaughton and J. Conrad and S. Cutini and Filippo D’Ammando and Alessandro De Angelis and M. Deklotz and Francesco de Palma and Charles D. Dermer and Rachele Desiante and Anne M. Diekmann and Leonardo Di Venere and P. Drell and Alex Drlica-Wagner and Cecilia Favuzzi and Stephen Fegan and Elizabeth C. Ferrara and Justin D. Finke and Gerard Fitzpatrick and W. B. Focke and Anna Franckowiak and Yasushi Fukazawa and Stefan Funk and Piergiorgio Fusco and Fabio Gargano and Neil Gehrels and S Germani and Melissa Gibby and N. Giglietto and Misty M. Giles and Francesco Giordano and Marcello Giroletti and Gary Lunt Godfrey and Jonathan Granot and Isabelle A. Grenier and J. E. Grove and David Gruber and Sylvain Guiriec and D. Hadasch and Yoshitaka Hanabata and Alice K. Harding and Morihiro Hayashida and E. Hays and Deirdre Horan and Rebecca E. Hughes and Yosihiro Inoue and Tobias Jogler and Guðlaugur J{\'o}hannesson and W. Neil Johnson and Taro Kawano and J{\"u}rgen Kn{\"o}dlseder and D. Kocevski and Michael Kuss and Joshua Lande and S. Larsson and Luca Latronico and Francesco Longo and Francesco Loparco and Michael N. Lovellette and Pasquale Lubrano and Matthias P. Mayer and Mario N. Mazziotta and Julie Mcenery and P. F. Michelson and Tsunefumi Mizuno and Alexander A Moiseev and M. E. Monzani and Enrico Moretti and A. Morselli and Igor V. Moskalenko and Simona Murgia and Rodrigo Nemmen and Eric Nuss and Masanori Ohno and Takashi Ohsugi and Akira Okumura and Nicola Omodei and Monica Orienti and D. Paneque and V{\'e}ronique Pelassa and J. S. Perkins and Melissa Pesce-Rollins and Vah{\'e} Petrosian and F. Piron and Giovanna Pivato and Troy A. Porter and Judith Racusin and S. Rain{\'o} and R. Rando and Massimiliano Razzano and Soebur Razzaque and A. Reimer and O. Reimer and Steven M. Ritz and Markus Roth and Felix Ryde and Angelica Sartori and P. M. Saz Parkinson and Jeffrey D. Scargle and Alexander Schulz and Carmelo Sgro’ and Eric J. Siskind and E. Sonbas and G. Spandre and Paolo Spinelli and Hiroyasu Tajima and H. Takahashi and John Gregg Thayer and Jana Thayer and D. J. Thompson and Luigi Tibaldo and Marco Tinivella and Diego F. Torres and Gino Tosti and Eleonora Troja and T. L. Usher and Justin Vandenbroucke and Vlasios Vasileiou and G. Vianello and Vincenzo Vitale and B. L. Winer and Kent S. Wood and R. Yamazaki and George Younes and H.-F. Yu and S. J. Zhu and P. N. Bhat and M S Briggs and David Byrne and Suzanne Foley and Adam Goldstein and Peter Jenke and Richard Marc Kippen and Chryssa Kouveliotou and Sheila McBreen and Charles A. Meegan and W. S. Paciesas and R. D. Preece and Arne Rau and Dave Tierney and Alexander J. van der Horst and Andreas von Kienlin and Colleen A. Wilson-Hodge and Shaolin Xiong and G Cusumano and Valentina La Parola and Jay R. Cummings},
  journal={Science},
  year={2014},
  volume={343},
  pages={42 - 47}
}
Bright Lights Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), bright flashes of gamma-ray light, are thought to be associated with the collapse of massive stars. GRB 130427A was detected on 27 April 2013, and it had the longest gamma-ray duration and one of the largest isotropic energy releases observed to date (see the Perspective by Fynbo). Ackermann et al. (p. 42, published online 21 November) report data obtained with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope, which reveal a high-energy spectral component that cannot… Expand
The Bright Optical Flash and Afterglow from the Gamma-Ray Burst GRB 130427A
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References

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The Bright Optical Flash and Afterglow from the Gamma-Ray Burst GRB 130427A
TLDR
The link between optical afterglow and >100-MeV emission suggests that nearby early peaked afterglows will be the best candidates for studying gamma-ray emission at energies ranging from gigaelectron volts to teraelectrons volts. Expand
The First Pulse of the Extremely Bright GRB 130427A: A Test Lab for Synchrotron Shocks
TLDR
Multiwavelength data from an extremely bright stellar explosion provide details of the physics of these violent events, and suggests that existing models cannot explain all the observed spectral and temporal behaviors simultaneously. Expand
GRB 130427A: A Nearby Ordinary Monster
TLDR
A comprehensive multiwavelength view of GRB 130427A with Swift, the 2-meter Liverpool and Faulkes telescopes, and by other ground-based facilities is presented, highlighting the evolution of the burst emission from the prompt to the afterglow phase and suggesting that a common central engine is responsible for producing GRBs in both the contemporary and the early universe. Expand
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DISCOVERY OF AN EXTRA HARD SPECTRAL COMPONENT IN THE HIGH-ENERGY AFTERGLOW EMISSION OF GRB 130427A
The extended high-energy gamma-ray (> 100 MeV) emission which occurs after prompt gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is usually characterized by a single power-law spectrum, which has been explained as theExpand
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