Corpus ID: 31244669

Femoropopliteal Angioplasty: Factors Influencing Long‐term Success

@article{apek1991FemoropoplitealAF,
  title={Femoropopliteal Angioplasty: Factors Influencing Long‐term Success},
  author={P. {\vC}apek and G. Mclean and H. Berkowitz},
  journal={Circulation},
  year={1991},
  volume={83},
  pages={I-70–I-80}
}
Prospective data was recorded on 217 percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) procedures performed in the superficial femoral and popliteal arteries over an 8-year period. After the initial procedure, patients were followed with serial noninvasive studies and, in 71 patients, repeat angiography. The mean follow-up period was 7 years (range, 2-11 years). Standard life-table survival analysis was used to assess the factors potentially affecting long-term outcome. Excluding an initial technical… Expand
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Although many factors influence the initial and long-term success rate, results of this study justify PTA in the femoropopliteal artery, patients with localized stenoses and short occlusions are best suited for this treatment. Expand
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