Females produce larger eggs for large males in a paternal mouthbrooding fish

@article{Kolm2001FemalesPL,
  title={Females produce larger eggs for large males in a paternal mouthbrooding fish},
  author={Niclas Kolm},
  journal={Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences},
  year={2001},
  volume={268},
  pages={2229 - 2234}
}
  • N. Kolm
  • Published 2001
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences
When individuals receive different returns from their reproductive investment dependent on mate quality, they are expected to invest more when breeding with higher quality mates. A number of studies over the past decade have shown that females may alter their reproductive effort depending on the quality/attractiveness of their mate. However, to date, despite extensive work on parental investment, such a differential allocation has not been demonstrated in fish. Indeed, so far only two studies… Expand

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