Female zebra finches choose extra-pair copulations with genetically attractive males

@article{Houtman1992FemaleZF,
  title={Female zebra finches choose extra-pair copulations with genetically attractive males},
  author={Anne M. Houtman},
  journal={Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences},
  year={1992},
  volume={249},
  pages={3 - 6}
}
  • A. Houtman
  • Published 22 July 1992
  • Biology
  • Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences
One way that sexual selection for genetic benefits could operate in monogamous species is through female choice during extra-pair copulations (EPCS). EPCS are common in monogamous species, and field studies are consistent with the hypothesis of females choosing genetically attractive males for EPCS. Here I show that female zebra finches actively solicit and perform EPCS with males that are more attractive than their mates. Attractive males have higher song rates, have sons with higher song… 

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