Female resistance to male seduction in zebra finches

@article{Forstmeier2004FemaleRT,
  title={Female resistance to male seduction in zebra finches},
  author={Wolfgang Forstmeier},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2004},
  volume={68},
  pages={1005-1015}
}
  • W. Forstmeier
  • Published 1 November 2004
  • Biology, Psychology
  • Animal Behaviour
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No Band Color Effects on Male Courtship Rate or Body Mass in the Zebra Finch: Four Experiments and a Meta-Analysis
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Four independent failures to replicate the presumed manipulation of male attractiveness in zebra finches by adding red or green color bands are reported, and it is shown that color bands seem to affect neither male courtship rate nor male body mass.
Cryptic Sexual Conflict in Gift‐Giving Insects: Chasing the Chase‐Away
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Results suggest that the spermatophylax synthesized by male G. Sigillatus contains substances designed to inhibit the sexual receptivity of their mates but that female G. sigillatus have evolved reduced responsiveness to these substances.
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TLDR
Male mate choice in zebra finches is examined with respect to experimental manipulation of female fecundity, and it is shown that males are able to distinguish females that have higher fertility, and that this is not the result of relative female competitiveness or dominance status.
Do Female Zebra Finches Vary Primary Reproductive Effort in Relation to Mate Attractiveness
TLDR
It is shown that female zebra finches, Taeniopygia guttata, vary their 'primary' reproductive effort in egg production in relation to the attractiveness of their male partner, for some components of reproduction but not others.
The role of sexual imprinting for sex recognition in zebra finches: a difference between males and females
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TLDR
It is concluded that preference for male beak colour was acquired only by females reared by parents with unlike, discriminative, beak colours, and an associative learning basis for sexual imprinting is suggested.
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TLDR
Meta-analyses show that when all mate choice experiments involving combs are analysed together, female preference is significantly related to male comb morphology, which is consistent with current understanding of the signalling value of the comb of male red junglefowl.
Repeatability of mate choice in the zebra finch: consistency within and between females
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TLDR
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TLDR
It was found that female zebra finches paired to a vasectomized male, and hence receiving no sperm, were no more likely to seek an extra-pair copulation than females paired to an intact male.
Primary and secondary sex ratio manipulation by zebra finches
TLDR
It is suggested that zebra finches manipulate both their primary and secondary sex ratios in relation to food availability to invest adaptively in sons and daughters, and support Trivers & Willard's hypothesis of adaptive sexual investment.
Female mate choice in the zebra finch — the effect of male beak colour and male song
TLDR
Female preference for males with red beaks was not found when beak and song characters were no longer correlated, and in mate choice tests involving two males, beak colour was manipulated artificially using nail varnish.
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