Female reproductive strategies, paternity and community structure in wild West African chimpanzees

@article{Gagneux1999FemaleRS,
  title={Female reproductive strategies, paternity and community structure in wild West African chimpanzees},
  author={Pascal Gagneux and Christophe Boesch and David S. Woodruff},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={1999},
  volume={57},
  pages={19-32}
}
Although the variability and complexity of chimpanzee behaviour frustrates generalization, it is widely believed that social evolution in this species occurs in the context of the recognizable social group or community. We used a combination of field observations and noninvasive genotyping to study the genetic structure of a habituated community of 55 wild chimpanzees, Pan troglodytes verus, in the Taï Forest, Côte d'Ivoire. Pedigree relationships in that community show that female mate choice… Expand
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