Female pattern hair loss in complete androgen insensitivity syndrome

@article{Cousen2010FemalePH,
  title={Female pattern hair loss in complete androgen insensitivity syndrome},
  author={Philippa Cousen and A G Messenger},
  journal={British Journal of Dermatology},
  year={2010},
  volume={162}
}
Female pattern hair loss, also known as female androgenetic alopecia, is generally regarded as an androgen‐dependent disorder representing the female counterpart of male balding. We describe female pattern hair loss occurring in a patient with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome suggesting that mechanisms other than direct androgen action contribute to this common form of hair loss in women. 
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The role of androgens in FPHL has not been clearly established, and most women with androgenetic alopecia have normal serum androgen levels; however, antiandrogen medications can still be effective in the treatment. Expand
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Female pattern hair loss: beyond an androgenic aetiology? Reply from authors
TLDR
While the authors’ argument that ‘future research into FPHL and its treatment should not be restricted to an androgenic aetiology’ is fully agree, it deserves to be kept in mind that the hair growth modulatory effects of prolactin may potentially constitute another important mechanism contributing to FPHL in androgen insensitivity syndrome. Expand
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