Female-female aggression explains polyterritoriality in male pied flycatchers

@article{Slagsvold1992FemalefemaleAE,
  title={Female-female aggression explains polyterritoriality in male pied flycatchers},
  author={Tore Slagsvold and Trond Amundsen and Svein Dale and Helene M. Lampe},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={1992},
  volume={43},
  pages={397-407}
}
Abstract Many male pied flycatchers, Ficedula hypoleuca , try to attract a second mate in a distant territory around the time their initial mate lays her clutch. In this study their success at becoming polygynous increased with the distance between the two territories. Two hypotheses may explain this result: either females are prevented from settling close to the male's initial nest because of aggression from the initial female (the female aggression hypothesis), or males can more easily hide… Expand
Do pied flycatcher females guard their monogamous status?
TLDR
The deception hypothesis suggests that pied flycatcher, Ficedula hypoleuca, males are more successful at distant secondary territories, since they are able to hide their mating status, and aggression of a mated female may play some role in male polyterritoriality. Expand
Does female aggression prevent polygyny? An experiment with pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca)
TLDR
A mate choice experiment on pied flycatchers Ficedula hypoleuca is presented to provide prospecting females with a choice between displaying mated males some of which have initial mates with artificially reduced levels of aggressiveness. Expand
Polygyny and female aggression in the pied flycatcher: a comment on Rätti et al.
TLDR
It is argued that a test of the female aggression hypothesis on pied flycatchers, Ficedula hypoleuca, concluded that female aggression was not important in explaining polyterritoriality in this species but that the deception hypothesis was mope plausible. Expand
INTERSEXUAL COMPETITION IN A POLYGYNOUS MATING SYSTEM
TLDR
To be able to construct models predicting when a particular mating system should be expected, more has to be learnt about the costs of male mate attraction and nest defence behaviour and female aggression. Expand
Aggression among female lapwings, Vanellus vanellus
TLDR
The results suggest that female lapwings attempt to prevent their mates from attracting a new mate and thus try to monopolize their parental care. Expand
Female Attraction Behaviour of Radio Tagged Polyterritorial Pied Flycatcher Males
TLDR
The behaviour of polyterritorial and unmated males was studied by radio tagging that allows accurate recording of male movements and found that attracting a secondary female polyterristorial males spent significantly less time on the secondary territory than did unmated Males on their single territory. Expand
Determinants of the Mating Success of Polyterritorial Pied Flycatcher Males
TLDR
Results show clearly that male mating success was improved with an increase in the distance between territories up to a distance of about 200–300 m, which is crucial for both the deception hypothesis and female-female aggression hypothesis which have been put forward to explain polyterritorial polygyny. Expand
Already mated females constrain male mating success in the European starling
TLDR
The hypothesis that already mated females constrain the mating success of their mates is supported by manipulating the distance between their mates’ potential breeding sites in the European starling. Expand
Female aggressiveness towards female decoys decreases with mate T level in the pied flycatcher
TLDR
The role of T levels in female-female competition in a songbird, the pied flycatcher Ficedula hypoleuca, is explored and it is found that female aggressiveness is more strongly related to the hormonal status of mates than to their own. Expand
Female aggression in the European starling during the breeding season
TLDR
It is demonstrated that females spent more time near their nest site during the pre-laying period when their mate had access to an additional nestbox than when he had not, which is most consistent with females trying to secure male brood-rearing assistance by preventing or delaying the settlement of secondary females. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 20 REFERENCES
Polygyny in the pied flycatcher, Ficedula hypoleuca: a test of the deception hypothesis
TLDR
The deception hypothesis was not supported by the data, and the reduced reproductive success of secondary females may be explained by the cost of searching for a mate. Expand
On the cost of searching for a mate in female pied flycatchers Ficedula hypoleuca
TLDR
The length of the premating period was negatively correlated with female body weight and prevailing air temperature, indicating that the females were subject to an energy constraint when searching, and competition for a mate, rather than for food, may explain the spacing of males. Expand
Why do pied flycatcher females mate with already-mated males?
TLDR
It is suggested that males, by being polyterritorial, deceive females into accepting polygyny; and females can be deceived since they do not have time to find out the marital status of males. Expand
The Conflict Between Male Polygamy and Female Monogamy: The Case of the Pied Flycatcher Ficedula hypoleuca
TLDR
It is contention that, in the "battle between the sexes," the male sex is relatively victorious in the pied flycatcher as compared with most altricial bird species which are strictly or almost strictly monogamous. Expand
Polyterritorial Polygyny in the Pied Flycatcher
TLDR
It is explained that offspring raised by polygynously mated males receive less food as a result of the reduced male feeding assistance at such nests, and that secondary females raise fewer offspring that most likely are of poorer quality than offspring of monogamous and primary females. Expand
The function of courtship feeding during incubation in the pied flycatcher Ficedula hypoleuca
TLDR
Results of a nest predation experiment, forcing birds to re-nest, did not support the hypothesis that courtship feeding strengthens the bond between the sexes, and there was no evidence that the rate of Courtship feeding is a reliable indicator of the quality of male parental care. Expand
Allocation of incubation feeding in a polygynous mating system: a study on pied flycatchers Ficedula hypoleuca
TLDR
The pattern of investment by polygynous males was unrelated to the time-lag between completion of the different clutches and to any difference in clutch size, and the reduction in the delivery rate to polygynously mated females had a negative effect on their incubation efficiency. Expand
Aggression of breeding eastern bluebirds (Sialia sialis) toward their mates and models of intra-and interspecific intruders
TLDR
The responses of the resident males to models of male bluebirds decreased from the egg-laying to the nestling stage, and this response pattern can be interpreted as support for the protection-of-parentage hypothesis or the nest-site-defence hypothesis. Expand
Extra-Pair Copulations and Mate Guarding in the Polyterritorial Pied Flycatcher, Ficedula Hypoleuca
TLDR
It is most likely that male reproductive strategies are not maintained as a frequency-dependent mixed ESS with equal pay-offs for all paired males, Instead, male strategies are conditional on phenotype and breeding circumstances. Expand
THE EVOLUTION OF FEMALE BODY SIZE IN RED‐WINGED BLACKBIRDS: THE EFFECTS OF TIMING OF BREEDING, SOCIAL COMPETITION, AND REPRODUCTIVE ENERGETICS
TLDR
It is found that large females had less fat than small females during breeding, and that the levels of fat that females of a given size carried affected breeding date and egg size, which indicates that social competition may favor large females, but reproductive energetics favoring smaller females may constrain selection for large female body size. Expand
...
1
2
...