Female dispersion and the evolution of monogamy in the dik-dik

@article{Brotherton1997FemaleDA,
  title={Female dispersion and the evolution of monogamy in the dik-dik},
  author={P. Brotherton and M. B. Manser},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={1997},
  volume={54},
  pages={1413-1424}
}
In facultatively monogamous mammals, females are thought to be too widely dispersed for males to defend more than one female range. We tested this hypothesis in a monogamous antelope, Kirk's dik-dik, Madoqua kirkii. Dik-dik territories were compared across three indices of quality to investigate whether males are monogamous because of constraints on the area, or resources, that they are capable of defending. Territories varied substantially in size and quality, with some containing up to five… Expand
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