Female dispersal and reproductive success in wild western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla)

@article{Stokes2003FemaleDA,
  title={Female dispersal and reproductive success in wild western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla)},
  author={Emma J. Stokes and Richard J. Parnell and Claudia Olejniczak},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2003},
  volume={54},
  pages={329-339}
}
This paper presents data on the dispersal patterns and reproductive success of western lowland gorilla females from a long-term study at Mbeli Bai in the Nouabalé-Ndoki National Park, Republic of Congo. We find that female natal and secondary transfer is common. Female immigration rates are negatively related to group size, and emigration rates are positively related to group size, with the net result that larger groups are losing females and smaller groups are gaining females. Furthermore… 

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