Female colour and male choice in sockeye salmon: implications for the phenotypic convergence of anadromous and nonanadromous morphs

@article{Foote2004FemaleCA,
  title={Female colour and male choice in sockeye salmon: implications for the phenotypic convergence of anadromous and nonanadromous morphs},
  author={Chris J. Foote and Gayle S. Brown and Craig W. Hawryshyn},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2004},
  volume={67},
  pages={69-83}
}

Female mate preference explains countergradient variation in the sexual coloration of guppies (Poecilia reticulata)

TLDR
Female guppies preferred males with intermediate drosopterin levels when the carotenoid content of the orange spots was held constant, the first direct evidence for a hypothesized agent of countergradient sexual selection is found.

Conspicuous Female Ornamentation and Tests of Male Mate Preference in Threespine Sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus)

TLDR
Results presented here are the first to explicitly address male preference for female throat color in threespine sticklebacks and suggest that males can discriminate color and other aspects of phenotype in the authors' experiment and that males may use these traits in intrasexual interactions.

Countergradient variation in carotenoid use between sympatric morphs of sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka ) exposes nonanadromous hybrids in the wild by their mismatched spawning colour

TLDR
This countergradient variation in carotenoid use results in a genotype-environment mismatch in nonanadromous hybrids that exposes them by their breeding colour on the spawning grounds, given that red colour is important in mate choice.

Does male mate choice select for female colouration in a promiscuous primate species?

TLDR
This study demonstrates that this trait may not have been sexually selected and that males mated regardless of such variation across females, and adds to the growing research on the role and evolution of female colouration in the context of sexual signalling and mate attraction.

Mate choice in fish: a review

TLDR
Intersexual selection, otherwise known as mate choice has been widely studied in many fish species and it is through a combination of some key concepts, theories and models that much of today’s study around the area has been allowed to develop.

Ornaments or offspring? Female sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus L.) trade off carotenoids between spines and eggs

TLDR
A population of three‐spined sticklebacks in which the females have conspicuous, carotenoid‐based red coloration to their pelvic spines is studied, and results do not support the ‘direct selection hypothesis’ to explain the existence of the female ornaments.

Investigating the behavioral significance of color pattern in a cichlid fish: firemouths Thorichthys meeki respond differently to color-manipulated video and dummy conspecifics

TLDR
The results reveal the potential for between-subject differences and experimental design parameters to interact critically in the study of animal color patterns.

Male mate choice favors more colorful females in the gift-giving cabbage butterfly

TLDR
Experimental manipulation of female wing coloration is used to investigate male mate choice in Pieris rapae, a gift-giving butterfly, and it is found that males showed significantly more mating approaches toward control females with more colorful wings (higher pteridine content), and that this preference was strongest in low-nutrition males.

COUNTERGRADIENT VARIATION IN THE SEXUAL COLORATION OF GUPPIES (POECILIA RETICULATA): DROSOPTERIN SYNTHESIS BALANCES CAROTENOID AVAILABILITY

TLDR
Compared the pigmentation and coloration of guppies from six streams in the field to that of second-generation descendants of the same populations raised on three dietary carotenoid levels in the laboratory, the results show clearly that the geographic variation in drosopterin production is largely genetic and that the hue of the orange spots is conserved among populations in theField, relative to the laboratory diet groups.

Advancing mate choice studies in salmonids

TLDR
What is presently known about mate choice and reproductive success in salmonids is synthesized, gaps in knowledge are identified and areas where there is a lack of consensus in results are identified, and interdisciplinary ways of advancing the understanding of mate choice in Salmonids and other polyploids are suggested.

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Examination of the preferences of female guppies from 11 localities in Trinidad shows that females are on average more attracted to males from their own population than from alien populations, and populations appear to vary in the criteria used in female choice.

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TLDR
Male traits and female preferences appear to be evolving in parallel in guppy populations, and in a comparison of seven populations, the degree offemale preference based on orange is correlated with the population average orange area.

The Mechanisms of Colour-Based Mate Choice in Female Threespine Sticklebacks: Hue, Contrast and Configurational Cues

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The results of mathematical models of colour opponent and luminosity processing suggest that female preferences are influenced by a male's belly colour contrast and not by merely its brightness contrast.

Divergent sexual selection enhances reproductive isolation in sticklebacks

TLDR
It is shown that female perceptual sensitivity to red light varies with the extent of redshift in the light environment, and contributes to divergent preferences in threespine sticklebacks, demonstrating that divergent sexual selection generated by sensory drive contributes to speciation.

COUNTERGRADIENT VARIATION AND SECONDARY SEXUAL COLOR: PHENOTYPIC CONVERGENCE PROMOTES GENETIC DIVERGENCE IN CAROTENOID USE BETWEEN SYMPATRIC ANADROMOUS AND NONANADROMOUS MORPHS OF SOCKEYE SALMON (ONCORHYNCHUS NERKA)

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Female sticklebacks use male coloration in mate choice and hence avoid parasitized males

TLDR
It is shown that in the three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) the intensity of male red breeding coloration positively correlates with physical condition, and the females recognize the formerly parasitized males by the lower intensity of theirbreeding coloration.

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TLDR
More studies taking an interpopulation approach to studying mate preference evolution are needed before the explanatory value of the indicator models can be rigorously assessed.

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TLDR
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TLDR
The results indicate that the morphology and life history of adult female salmon respond evolutionarily to local selection pressures, including both the biotic demands of breeding competition and the abiotic demands of migration.

Male Mate Choice Dependent On Male Size in Salmon

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TLDR
Non-anadromous sockeye salmon males (kokanee), Oncorhynchus nerka, were tested to determine if they select mates according to their absolute size (fork length) or if male mate choice was governed by the size of the male, and the results demonstrated male choice is dependent on male size and not solely on the absolute size of females.
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