Female choice in the field cricket Gryllus bimaculatus (De Geer)

@article{Simmons1986FemaleCI,
  title={Female choice in the field cricket Gryllus bimaculatus (De Geer)},
  author={Leigh W. Simmons},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={1986},
  volume={34},
  pages={1463-1470}
}
Females of the field cricket G. bimaculatus show multiple mating. Since such a strategy is likely to incur costs such as time and energy spent in orientation to calling males or increased susceptibility to predation, it must have certain selective advantages. This study shows that multiple mating is a potential mechanism of mate choice. Females removed the spermatophores of some males before complete insemination was achieved. Females also remained with large males in order to mate a second or… Expand
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Female choice contributes to offspring fitness in the field cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus (De Geer)
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Female choice and the relatedness of mates in the field cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus
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While there was a weak tendency for females to prefer an intermediate degree of relatedness (cousin) over unrelated males, most evidence for this population suggests that female choice is simply a mechanism of inbreeding avoidance. Expand
Sperm competition as a mechanism of female choice in the field cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus
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  • Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
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