Female choice and pre-existing bias: visual cues during courtship in two Schizocosa wolf spiders (Araneae: Lycosidae)

@article{McClintock1996FemaleCA,
  title={Female choice and pre-existing bias: visual cues during courtship in two
 Schizocosa
 wolf spiders (Araneae: Lycosidae)},
  author={William J. McClintock and George W. Uetz},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={1996},
  volume={52},
  pages={167-181}
}
Male wolf spiders, Schizocosa ocreata, possess tufts of bristles on the forelegs, which are used in visual courtship displays, but males of a closely related species, S. rovneri, lack tufted forelegs. In studies with live males, female S. ocreata showed receptivity more often to males with larger tufts than to males with smaller or shaved tufts. Male body size and/or shaving of tufts may aVect male courtship behaviour, however, which could influence female receptivity. Manipulated video images… Expand

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