Female blue tits adjust parental effort to manipulated male UV attractiveness.

@article{Limbourg2004FemaleBT,
  title={Female blue tits adjust parental effort to manipulated male UV attractiveness.},
  author={Tobias Limbourg and A. Christa Mateman and Staffan Andersson and C Kate M Lessells},
  journal={Proceedings. Biological sciences},
  year={2004},
  volume={271 1551},
  pages={
          1903-8
        }
}
The differential allocation hypothesis predicts that parents should adjust their current investment in relation to perceived mate attractiveness if this affects offspring fitness. It should be selectively advantageous to risk more of their future reproductive success by investing heavily in current offspring of high reproductive value but to decrease investment if offspring value is low. If the benefits of mate attractiveness are limited to a particular offspring sex we would instead expect… CONTINUE READING

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