• Corpus ID: 90046975

Female Ornaments: Genetically Correlated or Sexually Selected?

@inproceedings{Amundsen2000FemaleOG,
  title={Female Ornaments: Genetically Correlated or Sexually Selected?},
  author={Trond Amundsen},
  year={2000}
}
Studies of sexual selection have so far focussed almost solely on males, and have been highly successful in explaining their often extravagant adornments. However, females of a variety of animal species are also beautifully decorated, but this fact has been largely ignored by evolutionary biologists until very recently. The traditional explanation for female ornamentation dates back to Darwin, and posits that it has evolved as a correlated by-product of selection on the same traits in males… 
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