Female Mobility and Postmarital Kin Access in a Patrilocal Society

@article{Scelza2011FemaleMA,
  title={Female Mobility and Postmarital Kin Access in a Patrilocal Society},
  author={Brooke A. Scelza},
  journal={Human Nature},
  year={2011},
  volume={22},
  pages={377-393}
}
  • B. Scelza
  • Published 19 November 2011
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Human Nature
Across a wide variety of cultural settings, kin have been shown to play an important role in promoting women’s reproductive success. Patrilocal postmarital residence is a potential hindrance to maintaining these support networks, raising the question: how do women preserve and foster relationships with their natal kin when propinquity is disrupted? Using census and interview data from the Himba, a group of semi-nomadic African pastoralists, I first show that although women have reduced kin… 
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The gender-specific labor demands of arid pastoralism often lead to spousal separation. Men typically respond in one of two ways: engage in mate guarding tactics, or loosen restrictions on female
Warfare induces post-marital residence change.
TLDR
It is shown that warfare can change post-marital residence practices, but such change only propagates through a wider network of communities under a narrow set of conditions.
Non-Parental Investment in Children and Child Outcomes after Parental Death or Divorce in a Patrilocal Society
Children rely on support from parental helpers (alloparents), perhaps especially in high-needs contexts. Considerable evidence indicates that closer relatives and maternal relatives are the most
Alloparental Care and Assistance in a Normatively Patrilocal Society
Parental care is often supplemented by “alloparents.” There is increasing research interest in who these alloparents are and how they affect child well-being. Most earlier research indicates that
Mother’s Partnership Status and Allomothering Networks in the United Kingdom and United States
In high-income, low-fertility (HILF) settings, the mother’s partner is a key provider of childcare. However, it is not clear how mothers without partners draw on other sources of support to raise
The expendable male hypothesis
TLDR
The expendable male hypothesis may explain the evolution of matriliny in numerous cases, and is concluded that female-centered approaches that call into doubt assumptions inherent to male-centered models of kinship are justified in evolutionary perspective.
Grandmaternal childcare and kinship laterality. Is rural Greece exceptional?
Abstract Grandmothers provide more childcare for their daughters' children than for those of their sons, almost everywhere. Exceptions occur where virilocal (patrilocal) postmarital residence makes
The expendable male hypothesis
TLDR
The expendable male hypothesis may explain the evolution of matriliny in numerous cases, and is concluded that female-centred approaches that call into doubt assumptions inherent to male- Centred models of kinship are justified in evolutionary perspective.
Sex difference in travel is concentrated in adolescence and tracks reproductive interests
TLDR
It is found that sex differences in travel peak during adolescence when men and women are most intensively searching for mates, and that men's and women's travel behaviour reflects differential gains from mate search and parenting across the life course.
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