• Corpus ID: 56227077

Female Fighting and Host Competition Among Four Sympatric Species of Melittobia (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae)

@article{Matthews2007FemaleFA,
  title={Female Fighting and Host Competition Among Four Sympatric Species of Melittobia (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae)},
  author={Robert W. Matthews and Leif D. Deyrup},
  journal={Great Lakes Entomologist},
  year={2007},
  volume={40},
  pages={6}
}
Melittobia is a genus of parasitic wasps well known for high levels of inbreeding and violent male combat. Casual observations of groups of sisters of M. femorata placed with hosts revealed a surprising incidence of body mutilations (broken or missing tarsi, antennae, and wings). Replicated conspecific groups of 1, 2, or 3 females of M. femorata, M. digitata, and M. australica and interspecific groups of M. femorata and M. australica (2:1) were observed over their first 10 days in newly… 

Figures and Tables from this paper

Biology of the parasitoid Melittobia (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae).
TLDR
Thought to be highly inbred, Melittobia do not conform to local mate competition (LMC) theory but exhibit simple forms of many social insect traits, including overlapping adult generations, different female phenotypes, close kinship ties, parental care, and altruistic cooperative escape behaviors.
Biology of the Parasitoid Melittobia (Hymenoptera
As parasitoids upon solitary bees and wasps and their nest cohabitants, Melittobia have an intricate life history that involves both female coop- eration and variably expressed male siblicidal
Solving the sex ratio scandal in Melittobia wasps
TLDR
It is shown that, in nature, females of M. australica have sophisticated sex ratio behaviour, where their strategy also depends upon whether they have dispersed from the patch where they emerged, and whether they should adjust their sex ratio in response to the number of females laying eggs on the patch.
Co-foundress confinement elicits kinship effects in a naturally sub-social parasitoid.
TLDR
It is found that relatedness and host size may combine to reduce selection against communal reproduction on hosts and that, unlike other studied parasitoids, G. nephantidis sex ratios conform to predictions of both classical and extended LMC theory.
Bethylids attacking stored‐product pests: an overview
TLDR
The main characteristics of each of the bethylids reported as biological control agent of these pests, including species that are serious pests of stored products are reviewed.
Wolbachia in two populations of Melittobia digitata Dahms (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae).
TLDR
Investigation of two populations of Melittobia digitata Dahms, a gregarious parasitoid, revealed that the Wolbachia harbored in both populations exhibited a wsp belonging to a unique subgroup within the B-supergroup of known wsp genes.

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 23 REFERENCES
Biology of the parasitoid Melittobia (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae).
TLDR
Thought to be highly inbred, Melittobia do not conform to local mate competition (LMC) theory but exhibit simple forms of many social insect traits, including overlapping adult generations, different female phenotypes, close kinship ties, parental care, and altruistic cooperative escape behaviors.
Increased male sex ratio among brachypterous progeny in Melittobia femorata, a sib‐mating parasitoid wasp (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae)
TLDR
Melittobia femorata Dahms is unique among the 13 species of Melittobia in that adults emerge as two temporally distinct clutches, and the elevated first clutch sex ratio in this species is discussed.
FEEDING AND SIBLICIDAL CANNIBALISM IN A MALE PARASITIC WASP (HYMENOPTERA: EULOPHIDAE)
TLDR
The ability of a male's capability to feed is tested, the longevity of artificially fed and unfed males is compared, and possible reasons for the comparative rarity of siblicidal cannibalism are discussed and its fitness implications are discussed.
The acasta conundrum: Polymorphism and taxonomic confusion within the parasitoid genus Melittobia (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae)
TLDR
Current species descriptors for this gregarious, polyphagous, polymorphic parasitoid group are called into question and Melittobia femorata Dahms is synonymized under M. megachilis (Packard).
On the Life-history of Melittobia acasta, Walker; a Chalcid Parasite of Bees and Wasps
Melittobia is a chalcid, ectoparasitic upon a number of species of Hymenoptera and upon the pupae of certain flies. The insect was bred in the laboratory and the life-history is described in detail.
THE POLYMORPHIC FORMS OF MELITTOBIA CHALYBII ASHMEAD AND THE DETERMINING FACTORS INVOLVED IN THEIR PRODUCTION. (HYMENOPTERA: CHALCIDOIDEA, EULOPHIDÆ)
TLDR
Both sexes of the second-form emerge as adults in a minimum of fourteen days after oviposition compared with the ninety days required for the development of individuals of the type-form.
Competition, territoriality and maternal defense in a gall-forming aphid
TLDR
Although the aggressive behavior of the adult aphid protects the gall and offspring, no distinct parental care behavior was observed and the territoriality and aggression are highly adaptive because of the limited number of galling sites.
Cooperative Chewing in a Gregariously Developing Parasitoid Wasp, Melittobia digitata Dahms, Is Stimulated by Structural Cues and a Pheromone in Crude Venom Extract
TLDR
It is suggested that the venom-associated cue may be a pheromone that facilitates mutual attraction, aggregation, and focused chewing, and that these behaviors may have arisen from behaviors associated with the initial stages of host attack.
Lethal combat and sex ratio evolution in a parasitoid wasp.
TLDR
It is shown that females of this species also fail to adjust their offspring sex ratio in response to the number of females laying eggs on a patch, suggesting that lethal male combat cannot fully explain the lack of sex ratio shift observed in Melittobia species.
Don't count your eggs before they're parasitized contest resolution and the trade-offs during patch defense in a parasitoid wasp
TLDR
Investigating the resolution of pairwise contests in Trissolcus basalis found that the female arriving first on the patch was more likely to win both the first agonistic encounter and to retain overall possession of the patch, suggesting a resource-correlated asymmetry in favor of the first female.
...
...