Female Coalitions Against Male Aggression in Wild Chimpanzees of the Budongo Forest

@article{NewtonFisher2006FemaleCA,
  title={Female Coalitions Against Male Aggression in Wild Chimpanzees of the Budongo Forest},
  author={Nicholas E. Newton-Fisher},
  journal={International Journal of Primatology},
  year={2006},
  volume={27},
  pages={1589-1599}
}
  • N. Newton-Fisher
  • Published 14 November 2006
  • Biology
  • International Journal of Primatology
In the wild, female chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) are subject to male aggression that at times can be prolonged or particularly violent. There are no reports of cooperative retaliation to such aggression, a strategy observed in the congeneric Pan paniscus, from the wild despite >4 decades of detailed behavioral study across a number of populations and its occurrence among captive female chimpanzees. If the reports from captivity represent an inherent capacity, then the absence of similar… 
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