Female–female competition for male ‘friends’ in wild chacma baboons (Papio cynocephalus ursinus)

@article{Palombit2001FemalefemaleCF,
  title={Female–female competition for male ‘friends’ in wild chacma baboons (Papio cynocephalus ursinus)},
  author={Ryne A. Palombit and Dorothy L. Cheney and Robert M. Seyfarth},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2001},
  volume={61},
  pages={1159-1171}
}
Lactating female chacma baboons, Papio cynocephalus ursinus, maintain close associations, or ‘friendships’, with particular males that may protect infants from sexually selected infanticide by a newly immigrated alpha male. In a 2-year study, we sought evidence of female–female competition for male friends in cases where two mothers maintained friendships with the same male simultaneously. In this context, relative competitive abilities of the rival females influenced social access to the… 

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