Feeding on the edge: the diet of the hazel dormouse Muscardinus avellanarius (Linnaeus 1758) on the northern periphery of its distributional range

@article{Jukaitis2012FeedingOT,
  title={Feeding on the edge: the diet of the hazel dormouse Muscardinus avellanarius (Linnaeus 1758) on the northern periphery of its distributional range},
  author={Rimvydas Ju{\vs}kaitis and Laima Baltrūnaitė},
  journal={Mammalia},
  year={2012},
  volume={77},
  pages={149 - 155}
}
Abstract Although the hazel dormouse Muscardinus avellanarius is considered both a highly specialized and a threatened mammal species in Europe, it is relatively common and widespread in Lithuania, situated on the northern periphery of its distributional range. We studied dormouse diet over the entire activity season using microscopic analysis of feces to gain a better understanding of its ecology. Our results confirm that the hazel dormouse is indeed a selective feeder, always showing a… 

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Nest sites used by dormice for breeding were distinguished by a better-developed understory, particularly by a significantly higher number of bird cherry trees and a lower number of Norway spruce trees in the canopy, as well as a higher diversity of plants in the understory and overstory.
Taxonomic and ecological composition of forest stands inhabited by forest dormouse Dryomys nitedula (Rodentia: Gliridae) in the Middle Volga
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Hazel dormice (Muscardinus avellanarius) in a regenerating clearing: the effects of clear-felling and regrowth thinning on long-term abundance dynamics
  • R. Juškaitis
  • Environmental Science
    European Journal of Wildlife Research
  • 2020
TLDR
Practice of small-scale clear-felling could be used for the hazel dormouse conservation in countries where this species is endangered.
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