Feeding ecology of the Iberian lynxLynx pardinus in eastern Sierra Morena (Southern Spain)

@article{GilSnchez2010FeedingEO,
  title={Feeding ecology of the Iberian lynxLynx pardinus in eastern Sierra Morena (Southern Spain)},
  author={Jos{\'e} Mar{\'i}a Gil-S{\'a}nchez and Elena Ballesteros-Duper{\'o}n and Jos{\'e} F. Bueno-Segura},
  journal={Acta Theriologica},
  year={2010},
  volume={51},
  pages={85-90}
}
The feeding ecol ogy of the critically endangered Iberian lynxLynx pardinus Temminck, 1827, was studied in the most important remnant population, located in eastern Sierra Morena (Sierra de Andujar Natural Park, Spain). Three hundred sixty scats were collected from October 2001 through Sep tember 2002. RabbitsOryctolagus cuniculus dominated the lynx diet, as showed by frequency of occurrence (94%) and percent age of volume (91%). Red-legged partridgesAlectoris rufa were the most important… 

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