Fecal Transplantation for Recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection in Older Adults: A Review

@article{Burke2013FecalTF,
  title={Fecal Transplantation for Recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection in Older Adults: A Review},
  author={Kristin E. Burke and J. T. Lamont},
  journal={Journal of the American Geriatrics Society},
  year={2013},
  volume={61}
}
Recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a common nosocomial infection that has a large effect on morbidity and quality of life in older adults in hospitals and long‐term care facilities. Because antibiotics are often unsuccessful in curing this disease, fecal transplantation has emerged as a second‐line therapy for treatment of recurrent CDI. A comprehensive literature search of PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science regarding fecal transplantation for CDI was performed to further… Expand
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