Feature-based control of attention: Evidence for two forms of dimension weighting

@article{Kumada2001FeaturebasedCO,
  title={Feature-based control of attention: Evidence for two forms of dimension weighting},
  author={Takatsune Kumada},
  journal={Perception \& Psychophysics},
  year={2001},
  volume={63},
  pages={698-708}
}
  • T. Kumada
  • Published 1 May 2001
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Perception & Psychophysics
In three experiments, I examined whether prior knowledge of a target feature dimension is useful for guiding spatial attention to the target in a variety of tasks: visual search (Experiments 1A and 1B), texture segregation (Experiment 2), and visual enumeration (Experiment 3). Experiment 1A used a simple search task and found that reaction times for blocks in which a target was defined within a single feature dimension were shorter than those for blocks in which a target was defined across… 
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