Feathers of Archaeopteryx: Asymmetric Vanes Indicate Aerodynamic Function

@article{Feduccia1979FeathersOA,
  title={Feathers of Archaeopteryx: Asymmetric Vanes Indicate Aerodynamic Function},
  author={Alan Feduccia and Harrison B. Tordoff},
  journal={Science},
  year={1979},
  volume={203},
  pages={1021 - 1022}
}
Vanes in the primary flight feathers of Archaeopteryx conform to the asymmetric pattern in modern flying birds. The asymmetry has aerodynamic functions and can be assumed to have evolved in the selective context of flight. 

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