Feathers, Dinosaurs, and Behavioral Cues: Defining the Visual Display Hypothesis for the Adaptive Function of Feathers in Non-Avian Theropods

@inproceedings{Dimond2011FeathersDA,
  title={Feathers, Dinosaurs, and Behavioral Cues: Defining the Visual Display Hypothesis for the Adaptive Function of Feathers in Non-Avian Theropods},
  author={Christopher C. Dimond and R. Cabin and Janie Brooks},
  year={2011}
}
  • Christopher C. Dimond, R. Cabin, Janie Brooks
  • Published 2011
  • Psychology
  • Abstract. With growing evidence for the presence of feathers in theropod dinosaurs, scientists have become increasingly interested in what adaptive function the earliest feathers served. The three predominant hypotheses are 1) flight, 2) thermoregulation, and 3) visual display. While the first two hypotheses have each received considerable attention and analysis, the third has often been mentioned yet has been inadequately described and analyzed. We define the visual display hypothesis as… CONTINUE READING
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